steven-gellar-katz-lcsw-rStephen Geller Katz LCSW-R

Misophonia Cognitive Retraining Therapy

mtv-true-life-i-have-misophonia-steven-gellar-katz-lcsw-r

Misophonia Cognitive Retraining Therapy, as featured on the MTV True Life episode: “I Have Misophonia” premiering Friday, December 16th, 7:00 PM EST. See Clip >

Are you Suffering from any of these symptoms as a result of Misophonia? Call for a Free 15 Minute Consultation.

  • Mild to severe anxiety
  • Rage or Anger
  • Triggered fight or flight
  • Depression
  • Negative thinking
  • Crying spells
  • Hopelessness
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Avoidance of people or places
Moderate to severe anxiety triggered by chewing sounds, including:
  • Nail clipping 
  • Brushing teeth
  • Eating sounds
  • Lip smacking
  • Breathing
  • Certain voices
  • Sniffing
  • Talking
  • Sneezing
  • Yawning
  • Walking
  • Coughing
  • Chewing gum
  • Laughing
  • Snoring
  • Typing on a keyboard
  • Whistling
  • Certain consonants


You may also be affected by visual stimuli, such as repetitive foot or body movements, fidgeting or movement you observe out of the corners of their eyes. 
Intense anxiety, rage and avoidant behavior may develop as a result of misophonia.


woman-misophonia* Do you feel your family and friends don’t understand how much you suffer?

* Do you often feel you can just suffer through a social event where there is eating present only to find that you must “escape” before you have a panic attack?

* Do you find that some people are at first understanding and make some efforts not to make the triggering sounds in front of you, but soon forget and constantly have to be reminded, causing you to feel angry, anxious and depressed?

* Are you avoiding social activities that you enjoy because of the misophonia?

* Are you fearful of losing your job and/or is the misophonia effecting your job performance?


If you answered yes to 3 or more of these questions or symptoms, then we can help.


You may be a candidate for Misophonia Cognitive Retraining Therapy, or MCRT.

Stephen Geller Katz, LCSW-R, with over 20 years of clinical experience, a New York University graduate, developed Misophonia Cognitive Retraining Therapy and founded Misophonia Cognitive Center in response to the growing number of people with Misophonia coming to his private practice from audiologists and ENTs. He discovered that by helping people to retrain and reinterpret the thoughts around their Misophonia, anxiety and depression symptoms began to improve. But even more important so did the Misophonic trigger response.

Call us at 646-585-2251 for a FREE consultation.

Category Archives: Anxiety

Misophonia and Anxiety

What are the relationships between misophonia and anxiety? In simple words, misophonia is hatred towards the sound. If you find everyday sounds annoying like chewing, eating, slurping, a clock ticking, shoe tapping, then you might have misophonia. Many studies show that misophonia is a symptom of anxiety disorder. Meanwhile, other researches show that misophonia is a separate disorder itself.

Misophonia and Anxiety

There are many pieces of research done on the subject. If you have misophonia, you might confuse it with anxiety and vice versa. Preliminary research shows that misophonia and anxiety are two different disorders, but both of the disorders might interrelate with another at some point (Cavanna & Seri, 2015).

Misophonia and Anxiety
Source

The major reason form people’s confusing is because both the disorders hit the same part of neurophysiological systems. When you feel anxious, you want to go away from the origin of the problem, and if you have misophonia, when you hear a trigger sound, you want to go away from the origin of the sound since both disorders make your respond similarly, so people confuse one another.

If you want to spot a difference between anxiety and misophonia, it is very easy. If you only get triggered by external visual and phonic cues, in that case, you have misophonia. It is very different from having anxiety. When you have anxiety, usually an internal stimulus is the trigger. It will get you anxious. Nevertheless, if you have severe misophonia, even thinking about the trigger sound will get you anxious.

When you talk about misophonia, the severe reactivity goes away as soon as you go away from the stimuli. For example, when you hear the sound of someone tapping shoes, you go away from the place, you immediately feel relaxed. This will happen to you when you have misophonia because the external stimuli were triggering you.

Meanwhile, if you are suffering from anxiety, the simple thought of having the next day will keep you thinking. A job interview will get you anxious. You might be thinking of the future, and it will get you anxious. You will notice, anxiety will be most likely to have an internal stimulus than external.

But if you are going through an anxiety attack, a misophonic stimulus might make it worse for you. Your nervous system is on an alert mood when you are thinking about something proactively since your system is on an alert mode, a misophonic stimulus will sound more intense than usual, and your anxiety will escalate and with added intensity. If you have anxiety and misophonia, then you might react to a misophonic stimulus more intensely than other misophonia sufferers.

Maintenance

The first step for misophonia maintenance is to know what sounds trigger you the most. You should also know about the disorder. You need to understand how the sounds affect your nervous system. When you learn about the disorder, you become a little less overwhelmed when you hear the trigger sound.

There are different ways by which you can manage your reaction towards the trigger sounds:

  • When you hear a misophonic trigger sound, you must concentrate on your thoughts. Check if you are having an anxiety attack or you have a misophonic response.

Once you differentiate between both reactions, it will be easier for you to unpack your response. It will not solve the entire problem, but it will somewhat help you.

  • The other way to overcome misophonia and anxiety is by meditating. Meditating will help you calm down and relax.

Meditating is a proven method to overcome any anxiety disorder. It will help a misophonic suffer from calming down and ignore when they hear the trigger sound.

Common Forms Of Misophonia

There are many forms of misophonia. All the forms make you react in different ways. You might also have a different level of misophonia. On all levels, you respond differently. The response might vary from aggressive to being annoyed.

The most common type of misophonia is when you react to oral noises. Around 80% of the misophonia sufferers deal with this type of misophonia. In this form, you might react on the different levels. If loud chewing noises make you violent and react unreasonably, then you might also have this form of misophonia.

Misophonia and Anxiety Relationship
Source

Final Words

Misophonia and anxiety are some of the common disorders around the world. Around 20% of the world population is suffering from misophonia, and 18.1% of the population is dealing with anxiety disorders.

For more information, visit our website or call us to schedule an online appointment

MISOPHONIA COGNITIVE CENTER
Stephen Geller Katz LCSW
646-585-2251

Are Misophonia and Anxiety Related?

anxiety-and-misophonia-info-01If you are one of the rare individuals who suffer with the noise syndrome known as misophonia, you are probably aware of the torment that patients go through in their daily life. Any small sound could trigger a big reaction. This syndrome can lead to significant anxiety, consistent overwhelming emotions and feelings, and even depression and suicidal thoughts. No matter how severe or mild your symptoms are, misophonia is a strongly displeasing issue to deal with every day. Living your life in fear of sound and in constant panic is no way to spend your time. If you’re new to misophonia and are wondering if your syndrome is directly connected to the development of anxiety, or vice versa, we can help you understand the nitty and gritty of the illness. The better you understand misophonia as a whole, the more you can improve your daily life and future.

What is Misophonia?

misophonia-anxiety-similar-compare-info-03The syndrome of misophonia strictly relates to the irritation and negative reactions that come after hearing or experiencing a certain noise, which we call a trigger. These sounds can be different for all individuals and usually depend on the way you were raised or what you have been classically conditioned to dislike. This means people who are affected by misophonia are likely not born with the syndrome. Because of this, it is harder to identify or pinpoint specific events that may have led to the cause of your misophonia. Undergoing therapeutic courses of treatment may help alleviate symptoms and possibly find the reason for your irritations or phobias. Dealing with misophonia is a very difficult process that should be addressed as soon as symptoms are apparent for the best results.

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is defined as a disorder characterized by fears or irritants that negatively affect how a person can regularly go about their day. Most of the time, anxiety is a normal and healthy emotion, as it regulates the body’s alertness. However, some people may have more advanced stages of anxiety that cause symptoms to appear consistently throughout the day. Anxiety is a very common disorder in the world, there being over 3 million cases in the United States alone. Anxiety is a difficult illness to deal with and may be related to symptoms of misophonia.

Are they Related?

misophonia-symptoms-management-nyc-specialist-01After studies were completed examining patients who show signs of both anxiety and misophonia, psychologists and medical providers have determined they are two separate disorders with separate triggers and symptoms. Regardless of them being different conditions, this doesn’t mean they can’t go hand in hand with another. Similar studies depicted that misophonia can lead to anxiety. Because misophonia may trigger heightened sensory states and lead to panic, it can be identified that anxiety can be a symptom of misophonia, but it is unlikely the opposite. Misophonia begins with external stimuli, while anxiety typically occurs internally. If you have misophonia and are being treated like you have anxiety, there may be better solutions to your daily suffering.

Get Treatment Today

In order to feel as good as you possibly can in life, it is important to visit a doctor or misophonia specialist to discuss symptoms and potential treatment options. Steven Katz LCSW is one of the best misophonia treaters in New York City and can significantly improve your symptoms.

Contact the Misophonia Cognitive Center to set up an appointment and start managing your Misophonia today.

Is Misophonia a Form of Anxiety? Will Treating Anxiety Help?

Is Misophonia a Form of Anxiety? Will Treating Anxiety Help?Suffering from any type of medical condition can be frustrating and hard to manage. For a condition like Misophonia, which is not fully understood nor easy to treat, it can be even harder to overcome this condition. Misophonia is a condition in which people dislike or even hate a specific sound. When they hear that sound, it causes a negative, and sometimes very bad, reaction. When this occurs, individuals need help and treatment. But, what type of treatment is best for it?

Is Misophonia the Same as Anxiety?

Is Misophonia a Form of Anxiety? Will Treating Anxiety Help?It is not a good idea to label Misophonia as anxiety for several reasons. First, this condition can produce anxiety in individuals when the trigger sound is heard. In short, the sound creates the anxiety in these individuals. On the other hand, some people who have anxiety at severe levels may develop Misophonia whenever they have an anxiety episode or attack. In other words, it can be caused by or the result of anxiety. However, it is not specifically anxiety because people can have many types of reactions that stem beyond just what traditional anxiety is. That’s important for people to understand when seeking out care for this condition.

Then, What Is It?

Because it is so hard to understand, doctors often can question the underlying cause and the symptoms significantly. Could Misophonia be a neurological problem, one in which the brain and central nervous system do not communicate properly? Could this condition be a psychiatric one, where it is just the perception of the sound that causes the flare up? And, in still other cases, it may be possible to label this condition as an auditory disorder in which the pathways or functionality of the ear is what is causing the resulting reaction.
Doctors do not fully understand this condition and there is no cure for it. However, as many as 80 percent of the people who seek out treatment for Misophonia will see some marked level of improvement in their symptoms according to some research. It is for this reason that individuals with this condition should always get treatment.

Is Misophonia a Form of Anxiety? Will Treating Anxiety Help?When you work with the best LCSW-R in New York City, you get the level of help and support you need to overcome this condition and to get back to living the quality of life you had. Seek out care that’s right for you.